Home / Tag Archives: internet technology (page 2)

Tag Archives: internet technology

The 21 Psychological Elements that Power Effective Web Design (Part 3)

How to get the order, the timing and the weight of your page elements lined up with the psychology of the customer's mind

The post The 21 Psychological Elements that Power Effective Web Design (Part 3) appeared first on MarketingExperiments.

Read More »

Digital Marketing News: Google’s Playable SERP Podcasts & New Unified Analytics, B2B Video Completion Rate Study & More

The post Digital Marketing News: Google’s Playable SERP Podcasts & New Unified Analytics, B2B Video Completion Rate Study & More appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

Read More »

How to Develop Superfans Who Gladly Evangelize for You

Do you want to create superfans for your business? Wondering how to develop the kind of connected community that elevated your brand? To explore how to develop superfans who will gladly evangelize anything for you and your business, I interview Pat Flynn. Pat is an active keynote speaker and host of the popular Smart Passive […]

The post How to Develop Superfans Who Gladly Evangelize for You appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Read More »

What Is an API & Why Does It Matter for Social Media?

Your Internet experience runs on APIs. The acronym has helped you compare the best prices for flights, allowed you to embed a map into Read more...

This post What Is an API & Why Does It Matter for Social Media? originally appeared on Sprout Social.

Read More »

How to Get on the Instagram Explore Page

If you’ve recently joined the visual-first hordes of Instagram to generate awareness and recognition for your brand, then there’s a good chance you’ve found Read more...

This post How to Get on the Instagram Explore Page originally appeared on Sprout Social.

Read More »

B2B Marketing Spotlight: Omar Al-Sinjari, Sr Digital Marketing Manager, RelayHealth McKesson #B2BSMX

Omar Al-Sinjari

Omar Al-Sinjari

Next week's B2B Sales and Marketing Exchange conference in Boston is coming up fast! To give you another sneak peek at the talented brand marketers sharing their insights and best practices, I've interviewed Omar Al-Sinjari, Senior Manager, Digital Marketing at RelayHealth - McKesson.

Omar is responsible for all things digital and a full stack operator including ABM, web, analytics, attribution, lead generation and marketing operations.

RelayHealth is a business unit of McKesson which is a $214 billion Fortune 10 company. Large enterprise level organizations bring with them a different set of marketing challenges and opportunities and with all of the evolution in B2B marketing and sales that has emerged, Omar is a great person to give us perspective.

At B2BSMX Omar will be on a panel (How To Do ABM At The Enterprise Level And Scale) Tuesday August 13th at 2pm. If you're thinking of attending B2BSMX, there's a 25% off discount code at the end of the interview.

Lee Odden: You've had a long history of working in the healthcare industry. Please share a bit about your background and current role as Senior Manager, Digital Marketing at RelayHealth - McKesson.

Omar Al-Sinjari InterviewOmar Al-Sinjari: Throughout my whole career I have either Marketed to or worked in the healthcare industry. I have been involved in Digital Marketing for the last 11 years, first at a very small company, sending out emails and redesigning/managing a website.

As my career progressed, I slowly became the SME regarding digital at each one of my jobs, which evolved into my passion for all things digital marketing.

Currently at RelayHealth – McKesson, I am responsible for all things digital. I currently own the digital strategy and execution including: Marketing Operations, Analytics, Attribution, ABM, Intent, SEO and Web Presence.

Lee Odden: You've accomplished a lot in your time with McKesson. What is the secret to success working in marketing at such a large organization?

When embarking on a digital transformation or any marketing change, you have to have thick skin and be willing to collaborate. @omaralsinjari

Omar Al-Sinjari: Collaboration, thick skin, openness to change and patience.

When embarking on a digital transformation or any marketing change, you have to have thick skin and be willing to collaborate. In my role at Corporate McKesson, I created a cross business unit group called Marketing Operations Leadership Council (MOLC) which brought together Marketing Ops leaders and practitioners across McKesson. This was an opportunity to collaborate, share best practices and make decisions across a huge Corporation.

Change doesn’t happen overnight and educating the business on why you are trying to change is imperative along with taken a data driven approach and assessing what the business needs are.

Lee Odden: Today's B2B marketing is a cornucopia of tactics from ABM to content marketing to influencer marketing, what advice can you share about how can B2B marketers find focus and make the right decisions on their tactical mix?

Omar Al-Sinjari: Partner with sales and customer success (account management) to better understand the customer.

From an ABM perspective you need to find out who to target and why. Ask the following questions:

  • Which accounts are best for expansion?
  • Which accounts have been difficult to target?
  • Who do you target?
  • What is their title?
  • Who are the people involved in the buying process?

Lee Odden: At B2BSMX you will be participating on a panel about ABM at the enterprise level. What are some of the top challenges with ABM at a large company?

Omar Al-Sinjari: In my role with RelayHealth, which is a business unit within McKesson, my ABM efforts are mainly focused at my business unit (BU) level. But I have shared some of my best ABM success with the other BUs and created a strategy and a playbook that can be used across the organization.

The great thing about ABM is, it's account based, so you need to target multiple people within an organization, not just one single person or one single lead. @omaralsinjari

Some of the biggest challenges with ABM are determining who the target market is: Who within the organization you want to target. Also understanding why. One of the hardest things with ABM is determining who you can target and why you want to target those folks because different people are involved in different stages of the buying cycle. The great thing about ABM is, it's account based, so you need to target multiple people within an organization, not just one single person or one single lead. Understanding that distinction allows you to be successful.

Lee Odden: ABM has gained quite a bit of momentum in the B2B marketing world over the last few years. Do you believe it's helped with bring sales and marketing together?

Omar Al-Sinjari: I think everyone has been account-based at some point in terms of knowing who you are going to target and why. So ABM and ABM platforms have put some technology behind those efforts and help facilitate the conversation between sales marketing.

ABM allows you to educate sales teams and the customer success teams because it's not just a marketing and sales conversation. @omaralsinjari

I think the concept of ABM enables marketers to talk to sales folks about who we need to target and why, instead of just saying, “Who are your top accounts?”.

The term ABM allows you to educate sales teams and the customer success teams because it's not just a marketing and sales conversation. In my opinion, it needs to be a sales, account management, customer success and marketing conversation. Then start trickling that throughout the rest of the organization as well.

An ABM platform enables those conversations and allows you to provide data and understanding, like what are the interactions and how many interactions are you having. ABM platforms then enable you to build a marketing attribution model based on those interactions.

Lee Odden: You're talking about bringing data together, ABM and ABM technology enabling conversations that happen between sales, account management, customer success and marketing and so forth. That's a much bigger and coordinated effort than you often find in campaign based marketing and traditional demand gen type programs, isn't it?

Omar Al-Sinjari: Oh yeah, for sure. It's not just batch and blast. I think previously a lot of marketers would try to figure out who their target accounts were, then go buy a list and just start sending them a bunch of emails.

What ABM and using an ABM platform allows you to do is to stay top of mind in their short term memory. @omaralsinjari

Marketing has evolved and I don't think people want to be marketed to that way anymore. I'm not even sure if people want to be shown display ads or targeted that way.

What ABM and using an ABM platform allows you to do is to stay top of mind in their short term memory. A buyer might have seen a solution two years ago, a solution they weren't quite ready to buy right away. Then a few years down the line, they remember that ad or that brand or that message and how it will allow you to solve one of your B2B problems.

Lee Odden: With your experience with ABM, I'm wondering what best practices you can share for other enterprise level B2B marketers?

Omar Al-Sinjari: Partnering and evangelizing ABM with sales and customer success as well as taking a data-driven approach to how you market from an ABM perspective.

If you do have some sort of insight tool on your website that tells you a company’s IP address, that could be a source of data saying that a company is interested or they're poking around our website. Or, if you're seeing multiple people from one company come into your website, that's giving you an indicator that people are interested. Then you add those folks to your ABM targets.

Partnering with the rest of the organization and educating the organization and getting people on board is especially important.

ABM is not just about net new customers, it's also how you churn your base and expand accounts, especially as your company has new acquisitions, new solutions or new products. @omaralsinjari

How you expand within those accounts is important and ABM is a great tool to stay top of mind.

When someone buys your solution, you could end up interacting with 10 or 15 different people, whether they are from procurement, security and risk, to the actual person that's going to be implementing. Understanding that there's not just one person and that you need to target an account as a whole is essential.

Best practice ABM is about finding all of the people that are involved in the process, plus that one person evangelizing your solution that you're trying to sell. @omaralsinjari

There are some situations where there are multiple stakeholders and the person that's signing the agreement might not even be involved in the buying process until the end. So, best practice ABM is about finding all of the people that are involved in the process, plus that one person evangelizing your solution that you're trying to sell. That evangelist will be one of your key targets, but understanding the customer as a whole picture is important.

Lee Odden: Do you have an ABM success story that you could share either one of your own or, or even something you've observed out in the industry?

Omar Al-Sinjari: We've experienced a significant, 40% growth within one of our segments year over year. That's by targeting folks in one specific vertical and focusing on some key customers.

You can look at a company like Terminus and see how much growth they've had implementing ABM. ABM is B2B marketing now. It's understanding and showing success and using data to drive decision making. Ultimately, what it all comes down to is, how are you attributing interactions to the bottom line?

Lee Odden: What are some of the top B2B marketing trends that you think are worth paying attention to in the coming year?

Omar Al-Sinjari: ABM, marketing attribution, and CDP or customer data platforms.

I don't know how many companies are listed on the Martech list now, but I think at some point there's going to be some sort of consolidation there.

If I had a crystal ball, I'd love to see what will be coming up from a technology standpoint and how people consume information from a B2B perspective. For example, understanding different stages according to where the buyer is in their journey and being able to use some sort of AI technology to identify and show trends across the buying cycle. Also, understanding the buying cycle and then using some sort of predictive analytics or AI to get deeper into data from an overall customer lifecycle perspective.

Lee Odden: What sources of information do you rely on most to stay on top of B2B marketing?

Omar Al-Sinjari: I use a few different sources including Chief Martech by Scott Brinker and the Marketo blog. There are several newsletters that I subscribe to and I use Google Alerts to track specific topics. I also stay up to date by attending conferences and learning from other people. I really enjoy reading case studies and about new technologies out there.

I also use social media, including Linkedin and Twitter to stay abreast of what's going on. It's changing all the time and everyone has opinions, right?

Lee Odden: What are you most excited about upcoming B2B SMX conference in Boston?

Omar Al-Sinjari: I'm excited for the Flip My Funnel track. I'm also excited for the REVTalks and Demand Gen Summit. I'm pretty much excited for all of it.

At B2BSMX I’m looking forward to learning from others because in this industry, you're constantly learning and you need to be able to adapt and change. @omaralsinjari

Really, I’m looking forward to learning from others because in this industry, you're constantly learning and you need to be able to adapt and change. And I think the overall message for ABM is change. It's changing the way you go to market, how you interact with different people in your organization and changing the narrative as it relates to marketing. Specifically, changing marketing from being a cost center to a profit center.

Lee Odden: Thank you Omar!

Be sure to follow Omar Al-Sinjari on Twitter: omaralsinjari

For information about the B2BSMX conference including agenda, speakers, workshops, mentor opportunities and more:

B2B Sales and Marketing Exchange: Boston
August 12-13, 2019
Encore Boston Harbor
GET 25% OFF using Discount Code: 25TRB
Registrationhttps://b2bsalesmarketing.exchange/registration

The post B2B Marketing Spotlight: Omar Al-Sinjari, Sr Digital Marketing Manager, RelayHealth McKesson #B2BSMX appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

Read More »

What Is a Squeeze Page, Anyways? (With 4 High-Converting Examples)

Here’s a clear definition of a squeeze page, tips on how to set one up for your next campaign, and four examples that show you how hard to squeeze.

Read More »

10 More Marketing Podcasts To Boost Your Business

Podcasting woman image.

Podcasting woman image.

Podcasts are a great way to learn new marketing ideas and get fresh perspectives on boosting your business, and we’ve compiled 10 more of the best podcasts for B2B marketers right here, following up on our recent list of “20 Podcasts To Elevate Your B2B Marketing,” and “Now Hear This: 10 Digital Marketing Podcasts to Educate and Entertain.”

These podcasts offer marketing news and insight from the innovators behind some of the world’s top firms, as well as their own stories, plus tips and advice to take your marketing efforts to the next level.

Whether it’s examining emerging trends in B2B marketing or heartfelt stories of life’s business and personal adventures, the hosts and guests on these podcasts have plenty to offer, and we're certain you’ll find something that strikes your fancy.

Here’s our list of 10 more diverse podcasts that will provide a fascinating array of ideas and trends to expand and improve your B2B marketing efforts, presented in random order.

#1 — The CMO Podcast

CMO Podcast Image

Summary: The CMO Podcast with Jim Stengel digs into the marketing and life challenges faced by today’s CMOs.

  • Hosts: Jim Stengel
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Agility: B2B with Purpose, Yoga for Marketing, How Big Brands Can Win Versus Story-rich Craft Brands,
  • Recent Guests: Lorraine Barber-Miller, Alicia Tillman, Ann Lewnes
  • Episode Length: 45 - 60 minutes

#2 — Ad Age Marketer's Brief

AdAge Marketers Brief Image

Summary: Ad Age Marketer's Brief takes a weekly dive into current marketing industry news, utilizing Ag Age’s cadre of marketing connections and reporters.

  • Hosts: Jessica Wohl and E.J. Schultz
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Hershey's head of media dishes on Twitch and other digital plays, Pizza Hut's brand leader: 'We're proud but dissatisfied', When it comes to marketing healthy food, it's all about using the right language
  • Recent Guests: Brent Montgomery, Charlie Chappell, Victor Lee
  • Episode Length: 25 - 30 minutes

#3 — The Cannes Lions Podcast

Cannes Lions Image

Summary: Offering creative marketing insight from some of the industry’s leading voices, The Cannes Lions Podcast takes the famed marketing event from a far-distant festival to actionable tips delivered on your own device weekly.

  • Hosts: Philip Thomas
  • Recent Topics on Tap: What exactly is great customer experience?, How can brands earn the right to be authentically part of culture?, Why is it so hard to prove the value of creativity?
  • Recent Guests: Monique Nelson, Michelle Melendez, Fernando Machado
  • Episode Length: 20 - 30 minutes

#4 — A Shark’s Perspective

Sharks Perspective Image

Summary: With more than 150 episodes, A Shark’s Perspective Marketing Podcast has featured many of the industry’s top marketers, including a recent in-depth conversation with our own CEO Lee Odden.

  • Hosts: Kenneth Kinney
  • Recent Topics on Tap: How Do You Make an Event an Experience, What Is the Human Element of Branding, What Do You Want Your Audience to Remember
  • Recent Guests: Dr. Carmen Simon, Ellaine Wellman, Lindsay Stewart
  • Episode Length: 25 minutes - 1 hour

#5 — The Big Story

Summary: Digital advertising insight and interviews are on tap weekly on The Big Story, AdExchanger's podcast covering recent marketing news.

  • Hosts: Ryan Joe
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Amazon Gets (Ad) Served, The Fire That Burns Brightest, Layser Sights
  • Recent Guests: Stephanie Layser
  • Episode Length: 25 - 30 minutes

#6 — How I Built This with Guy Raz

 How I Built This Image

Summary: National Public Radio’s How I Built This with Guy Raz explores the innovators behind some of the world’s top firms and digs in to their stories.

  • Hosts: Guy Raz
  • Recent Topics on Tap: Angie's BOOMCHICKAPOP, Yelp, Dave's Killer Bread
  • Recent Guests: Dave Dahl, James Dyson, Angie & Dan Bastian
  • Episode Length: 45 minutes - 1 hour and 15 minutes

#7 — The Strategy Inside Everything

Strategy Inside Image

Summary: A strategy-focused podcast that explores marketing, business, and more — The Strategy Inside Everything looks to dissect a wide range of pop culture events.

  • Hosts: Adam Pierno
  • Recent Topics on Tap: You can trust Jasmine Bina, Learning strategy with Kevin Rothermel, Ana Andjelic on brands in retail, digital and luxury
  • Recent Guests: Jasmine Bina, Kevin Rothermel, Ana Andjelic
  • Episode Length: 30 - 50 minutes

#8 — Making Marketing

Making Marketing Image

Summary: Making Marketing by Digiday is a weekly podcast dedicated to learning marketing by exploring the stories of industry leaders.

  • Hosts: Gianna Capadona, Shareen Pathak
  • Recent Topics on Tap: National Public Media’s Gina Garrubbo: The golden age of audio is here, Foot Locker's Jed Berger: 'The marketing industry is in for a revolution', Buffy's Paul Shaked: There's Facebook-first mentality in the marketing industry
  • Recent Guests: Gina Garrubbo, Jed Berger, Paul Shaked
  • Episode Length: 30 - 40 minutes

#9 — Business Unusual with Barbara Corcoran

Business Unusual Image

Summary: Offering weekly business insight, life lessons and motivation, Business Unusual with Barbara Corcoran features the “Shark Tank” star.

  • Hosts: Barbara Corcoran
  • Recent Topics on Tap: 8 Tricks To Build A Top-Notch Brand, The Secret Sauce To Raising An Entrepreneur, Time For An Attitude Adjustment
  • Recent Guests: Brian and Michael Speciale, Rick and Melissa Hinnant
  • Episode Length: 10 - 50 minutes

#10 — Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

Akimbo Image

Summary: Systems for actively changing our culture are explored weekly on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin.

  • Hosts: Seth Godin
  • Recent Topics on Tap: The hype cycle, Enrollment and possibility, Artificial Intelligence is Neither
  • Recent Guests: Tim Ferriss,
  • Episode Length: 20 - 40 minutes

What Are Your Favorite Brain-Boosting Marketing Podcasts?

via GIPHY

This list and the others we’ve researched only scratch the surface of the abundant marketing-related podcasts available. If you have a favorite that isn’t listed here, please leave a comment with your own top choices.

Finally, here are several helpful podcast marketing articles we’ve written recently, to help you decide whether a podcasting strategy might be a good addition to your own marketing toolkit.

The post 10 More Marketing Podcasts To Boost Your Business appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

Read More »

How to Use Memes: A Guide for Marketers

Looking for a fun way to engage people on social media? Have you considered using memes in your marketing? In this article, you’ll discover how your business can use memes to engage and connect with people. 4 Reasons to Include Memes in Your Social Media Content In a time when many consumers skip ads whenever […]

The post How to Use Memes: A Guide for Marketers appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Read More »

Wow Your Crowd: How Content Planning Sets the Stage for Unforgettable Experiences

Wow the Crowd with Content Planning

Wow the Crowd with Content Planning

We’re coming up on the 10-year anniversary of the movie Avatar, which was released in December of 2009 and held the title of highest-grossing film worldwide for nearly a decade before being unseated by Avengers: Endgame earlier this year. 

James Cameron’s signature cinematic spectacle presents a model worth following for any content marketer hoping to amaze their audience. We don’t need a $200 million budget, as Avatar had, but we should aspire to adopt the meticulous planning and strategic foresight that drove the film’s galactic success. 

This was the leading subject in our new interactive CMWorld experience, Witness the Greatest Content Marketing Show on Earth, produced in collaboration with Content Marketing Institute to create ahead of next month’s festivities in Cleveland. The show-stopper theme of the conference, and this experience, is designed to place content creators in the mindset of an entertainer, where dazzling viewers is the foremost goal.

Let’s explore some of the essentials of audience-first planning, with a little help from Mr. Cameron and our esteemed cast of CMWorld speakers. 

Elements of Planning a Showstopping Content Experience

#1 - Start with a Concrete Strategic Framework

It’s never too early to lay the groundwork for a content initiative. Cameron began writing Avatar in 1994, some 15 years before the movie actually came out. Virtually every great piece of entertainment is the result of thoughtful, collaborative, insight-driven planning. Success is no accident. 

 From a content marketing perspective, this means first documenting your strategy, and letting it serve as the backbone of your entire process. Here you will want to account for three key buyer stages: Discovery, Consumption, Action. (And if you’re thinking beyond the first sale, Retention and Advocacy.) Getting a customer-centric strategy nailed down embeds a consistent beacon for your entire team to follow, and ensures no one loses sight of whom you’re serving. It also minimizes confusion and wayward tactics.

As Amanda Todorovich, whose team at Cleveland Clinic has effectively made content a (monetizable) central attraction, puts it: “Your strategy shouldn’t be constantly changing. It should be a solid foundation that’s documented and communicated across the entire team. The investment of time needs to be made up front in establishing a solid framework and core strategy.”

[bctt tweet="Your strategy shouldn’t be constantly changing. It should be a solid foundation that’s documented and communicated across the entire team. — @amandatodo" username="toprank"]

#2 - Stay Nimble and Adaptive

Needless to say, if the vision for Avatar didn’t change in the 15 years between Cameron’s original script treatment and the movie’s ultimate release, the final product would’ve been… quite outdated. So while adhering to a stable core strategy is important, we also need to build flexibility into our planning, in accordance with evolving audiences and markets.

Just as movie-goers have dynamic tastes and preferences, so too do the customers and prospects we are marketing to. Vet your assumptions against data-driven research and interactions with audience members (e.g. surveys, polls, conversations). Stay in tune with trends around growing buying committees and lengthening purchase cycles. Don’t be afraid to make small bets in the name of failing-and-learning, because this is the only way to meaningfully innovate.  

[bctt tweet="We test, experiment, optimize and iterate our work every single day, but the core strategy stays constant because it’s still working/successful and aligns to our organization’s mission. — @amandatodo" username="toprank"]

#3 - Align with Technology Advancements and Audience Behaviors

The integration of cutting-edge 3D visuals helped elevate Avatar beyond any cinematic experience before it, and that’s a major reason for the film’s gobsmacking success. But another reason is the ambitious marketing efforts that coincided with the film’s release, including partnerships with other big brands to create experiences outside of theaters. 

We need to think about how our content is going to be discovered by a modern audience, and how we can optimize around these areas. One clear opportunity in today’s evolving content marketing landscape is voice search.

Addressing this emerging discovery method can feel intimidating at first, but it’s helpful to understand that optimizing for voice doesn’t require a drastic deviation from smart modern SEO practices. Google handles voice queries, like most others, through a question-and-answer convention, so the key to winning voice search lies in creating authoritative best-answer content.

Children’s Health’s Courtney Cox Wakefield, who will speak on the subject at CMWorld, echoes our thoughts on this nuance: “There’s a huge opportunity for voice search in content marketing and it begins with optimizing your content to rank in the answer box, which is then read by voice-first devices like Amazon Alexa and Google Home as their voice answers … You can get answer box rankings by implementing natural language headers, mimicking the structure of the content you see ranking for the queries you want to rank for.”

[bctt tweet="There’s a huge opportunity for voice search in content marketing and it begins with optimizing your content to rank in the answer box, which is then read by voice-first devices like Amazon Alexa and Google Home as their voice answers. — @CourtEWakefield" username="toprank"]

#4 - Emphasize Emotional Pull

In order to stand out and truly engage your audience, the content must connect at a deeper level. In Avatar, Cameron sought to establish this resonance through an alien sci-fi tale that was intrinsically relatable to human viewers.

In content marketing, there are numerous techniques for developing emotional hooks. But from our view, the most crucial — and the one that makes every other connective link possible — is trust

Trust is the linchpin of customer engagement, relationships, retention, and advocacy. Trust is so integral to successful branding and marketing today that we recently introduced our own reconfiguration of the traditional marketing funnel: the trust funnel, which shifts our strategic orientation toward this critical ideal more directly.

Margaret Magnarelli of Morgan Stanley agrees with this focus: “Trust is your ticket to admission, and therefore needs to be treated as a main event. Social science research shows that there are four main components of trust in human interaction: capability, benevolence, honesty and authenticity.”

[bctt tweet="Social science research shows that there are four main components of trust in human interaction: capability, benevolence, honesty and authenticity. — @mmagnarelli" username="toprank"]

Building trust through these four tenets should be a guiding objective from the very start of your planning. We can accomplish it through tactics like influencer credibility, being the best answer, and impactful storytelling (Cameron’s specialty).

Set the Stage for Your Next Exemplary Content Experience

Each of the steps above was instrumental in helping Cameron put together one of the most spectacular (and spectacularly lucrative) experiences in movie history. But just like any creator, his work was also shaped by the influence of peers and pioneers in his field. Among them is an icon of sci-fi cinema.

“Directors that continue to inspire me? Ridley Scott. I mean, I’ll go to see any Ridley Scott movie. Even the ones that bomb, to me, are great. Because of the fabric of the filmmaking. You know, just the way he sees, the way he places the camera, so on.

As strategic content marketers, we’re fortunate to be able to draw inspiration from a wide range of forward thinkers, many of whom will be on stage for Content Marketing World 2019, set to get underway on Sept. 3, 2019.

You can find plenty more insights from these experts, like the ones above, by visiting our interactive experience, Witness the Greatest Content Marketing Show on Earth. It’s a worthy first step in planning a content marketing blockbuster that wows your crowd.

The post Wow Your Crowd: How Content Planning Sets the Stage for Unforgettable Experiences appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

Read More »
css.php