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Our 2019 List: The Top 50 Social Media Marketing Influencers

2019 TopRank Marketing Social Media Marketing Influencers

2019 TopRank Marketing Social Media Marketing Influencers It’s that time of year, marketers. Once again, we’re absolutely thrilled to present our annual list of 50 influential leaders who are engaging on social networks around the topic of social media marketing. The goal of this annual list? To showcase the top 50 influential voices in the marketing industry we can all learn from and follow. List Methodology: Influencer Relationship Management (IRM) Platform Assisted: Ranking of the people in this list leverages data and algorithms from Traackr, which is an influencer relationship marketing platform. Unlike the vast majority of lists like this that are published online, this list considers many more data sources than just Twitter. To provide a better sample across the web, Traackr rankings can include citations and links from data sources such as blogs, publications, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram, and Pinterest. Ranking data sources and scoring: For the ranking, this list leverages a combination of data points including:

  • Relevance: A score that indicates how influential a person is to a specific topic based on the keywords you provide. Signals for relevance include keyword mentions, keyword diversity, content production rate, freshness of content and other contextual measures. In this case, it was “social media marketing” as well as 10-plus derivative phrases.
  • Resonance: A score of how impactful the influencer is with their audience. Resonance measures engagement activity that occurs as a result of publishing (mostly social) content.
  • Reach: A score derived by the reach algorithm that takes into account followers, fans, subscribers, visitors and other audience metrics. Remember, this is more than just Twitter.
  • Audience: Unsurprisingly, this refers to overall social audience size.

Each of these signal sources are factored into the algorithmic ranking for identified influencers with a focus on topical relevance, resonance of message with the audience and then audience reach. The result is a combination of broad-based influencers as well as individuals with a very specific focus and very high resonance and relevance scores. You’ll see new faces as well as as a variety of disciplines and specialties represented. Many thanks to all who continue to actively share their knowledge about social media marketing through year-round engagement and by providing help to others with insight and expertise in our vast social realm. We hope this list will serve as a handy jumping off point to start your ongoing journey of learning from these leading social media marketing industry influencers. You’ll likely see both many familiar faces and a wonderful variety of new social media influencers. We plan to learn new lessons from these 50 social media marketing influencers and hope you’ll do the same throughout the year.

2019 — 50 Social Media Marketing Influencers

Kim Garst @kimgarst
CEO, KG Enterprises Donna Moritz @sociallysorted
Visual Content Strategist, Socially Sorted Ian Anderson Gray @iagdotme
Founder, Seriously Social Neal Schaffer @NealSchaffer
CEO, NealSchaffer.com Madalyn Sklar @madalynsklar
Social Media Speaker & Consultant, MadalynSklar.com Dan Gingiss @dgingiss
CEO, Winning Customer Experience, LLC Brian Fanzo @isocialfanz
Founder and CEO, iSocialFanz Mari Smith @MariSmith
Social Media Speaker & Consultant, MariSmith.com Rebekah Radice @rebekahradice
CEO, RadiantLA Jasmine Star @jasminestar
CEO, JasmineStar.com Carlos Gil @CarlosGil83
CEO, Gil Media Co. Tamara McCleary @tamaramccleary
CEO, Thulium.co Dustin W. Stout @dustinwstout
Co-Founder, Warfare Plugins Peggy Fitzpatrick @PegFitzpatrick
Marketing & Social Media Manager, Kreussler Inc. Michael A. Stelzner @mike_stelzner
CEO & Founder, Social Media Examiner & Social Media Marketing World Lee Odden @LeeOdden
CEO, TopRank Marketing Christopher Penn @cspenn
Co-Founder and Chief Innovator, Trust Insights Owen Hemsath @owenvideo
Video Producer, The Videospot Bernie Borges @bernieborges
Co-Founder & CMO, Vengreso Samantha Kelly @tweetinggoddess
Owner, Tweetinggoddess Heidi Cohen @heidicohen
Chief Content Officer, Actionable Marketing Guide Brooke B. Sellas @brookesellas
Founder & CEO, B Squared Media Gini Dietrich @ginidietrich
CEO, Arment Dietrich, Inc. Roberto Blake @robertoblake
Owner & Creative Director, Create Awesome Media Chris Strub @chrisstrub
CEO, I Am Here LLC Mark Schaefer @markwschaefer
Executive Director, Schaefer Marketing Solutions LLC Jay Baer @jaybaer
Founder, Convince & Convert Nicky Kriel @nickykriel
Social Media Consultant & Strategist, Nicky Kriel Social Media Park Howell @parkhowell
Business Story Strategist & Keynote Speaker, Business of Story Amanda Webb @spiderworking
Social Media Trainer & Strategist, Spiderworking Andrew Pickering @andrewandpete
Co-Founder, Andrew and Pete Viveka Von Rosen @linkedinexpert
Co-Founder & Chief Visibility Officer, Vengreso Sean Cannell @seancannell
Founder, Think Media Amy Porterfield @amyporterfield
Online Marketing Expert & Trainer, Amy Porterfield, Inc. Steve Dotto @dottotech
President, Dotto Tech Guy Kawasaki @GuyKawasaki
Chief Evangelist, Canva Sue Beth Zimmerman @suebzimmerman
Keynote and Breakout Speaker, Sue B. Zimmerman Enterprise Ann Handley @annhandley
Chief Content Officer, MarketingProfs Sunny Lenarduzzi @sunnylenarduzzi
Social Media Strategist & Consultant, SunnyLenarduzzi.com Laura Rubinstein @CoachLaura
CEO & Social Media Strategist, Transform Today Josh Elledge @joshelledge
Founder, UpMyInfluence.com Ramon Ray @ramonray
Editor and Founder, Smart Hustle Magazine Chalene Johnson @chalenejohnson
CEO & Social Media Consultant, Team Johnson and SmartLife Brian G. Peters @brian_g_peters
Strategic Partnerships Manager, Buffer Robert Rose @Robert_Rose
Chief Troublemaker, The Content Advisory Lewis David Howes @lewishowes
Founder, School of Greatness John Jantsch @ducttape
President, Duct Tape Marketing Ian Cleary @iancleary
Founder, RazorSocial Jo Saunders @mrslinkedin
Trainer & Conference Speaker, Wildfire Social Marketing™ Billy Gene Shaw @askbillygene
Founder & CEO, Rethink & Relive LLC

Spread the Social Wisdom & Love

Statistical analysis, no matter how deep and well-researched, can only go so far in finding the people who you’ll find the most helpful and influential in your daily professional marketing lives, which is why we’d love it if you’d please share the name of social media marketers that influence you most in the comments section below. Some of our social media marketing influencers will be speaking at this week’s Social Media Marketing World 2019 conference, and we’ll have plenty of live-blog coverage of the event throughout the week, from our Senior Digital Strategy Director Ashley Zeckman and Content Strategist Anne Leuman. See where we’ll be here. To further your own social media marketing expertise, here’s a bonus list of our top 5 posts about social media marketing from the past 12 months:

The post Our 2019 List: The Top 50 Social Media Marketing Influencers appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

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About Daniel Rodgers

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Tales from the Trenches: How to Transition from Marketing Doer to Marketing Leader

I was roughly five years into my marketing career when I began managing my first direct report. It was the biggest challenge I faced yet. I was now being evaluated on the actions, successes, and failures of another person—and I also knew it was my responsibility to give them the support and tools they needed to have more successes than failures.

I felt as if I didn’t know how to influence, motivate, or persuade another person. But I was given the opportunity to try and to learn. I had a great group of bosses, mentors, and peers giving me advice, listening to my concerns or wins, and allowing me to make mistakes.

Quite a few years (and many direct reports) later, today I have a much better handle on how to manage a team. And as I’ve grown, I’ve learned that my job isn’t just to manage people, time, projects, or priorities, my job is to lead.

But it can be hard to make the transition from a “doer” to a leader. And the stakes are high. In fact, a recent study from TINYpulse found that nearly 50% of employees have quit a job because of a less than stellar manager. In addition, those who don’t feel recognized for their work are two-times as likely to be job hunting.

Whether you’re stepping into your first management role, moving onto middle management, or you have your eye on the CMO office, as a leader it’s your job to inspire, motivate, and grow a happy and high-functioning team. The insights below are designed to help guide you down a successful path to a fruitful career and happy, supported, and motivated employees. 

Tip #1: Understand the landscape

Whether you’re managing one team member or an entire department, you’ll be setting goals and playing an integral role in setting the marketing strategy your team is responsible for driving results with. But to do that, you must understand the broad and niche context in which your organization, department, or service line operates. This means getting to know your customers, prospects, and competitors more deeply, so you thoughtfully can guide and educate your team:

  • Seek out opportunities to hold monthly or quarterly one-on-one calls with your priority customers. Ask them what they value most about your organization or product, as well as where you can do better. 
  • Regularly research your competitors. Subscribe to emails, follow them on social media, and attend industry events where they might be speaking. This will give you unique intel that you can bring back to your team.
  • Get out of the marketing silo. Brainstorm with the sales team. Talk to your customer service team. These teams are intimately familiar with the challenges your customers and prospects face.

Tip #2: Set goals … and exceed them

Yes, you’ve probably be setting goals at all stages of your career. As an individual contributor, your goals were likely focused on what you could individually achieve. In a leadership role, you’re likely responsible for setting goals for your team that will ladder to corporate goals. If you are new to a leadership role, achieving goals that map directly to the success of the company, can be a quick win to build trust within leadership and grow your team and influence. 

  • Keep your goals top of mind. Discuss progress, roadblocks, and wins with your team, your boss, and other leaders. The more discussion around goals, the more likely you and your team are to remain focused and accountable on achieving them. 
  • Incentivize if you can. Big and small incentives can keep your team motivated to achieve their goals.
  • Make it a number. In my experience, setting and achieving a numerical goal has more impact on the organization and is generally more impressive than an accomplishment-based goal. For example, make the goal double MQLs, instead of rolling out a new marketing automation system. The marketing automation system is a stepping stone to reach the goal, not the actual goal. 
  • Set goals quarterly. Ninety days is long enough to achieve something big-ish, but short enough to keep you focused. We’ve found quarterly goals helps us track for the year and keep the team more motivated. 

[bctt tweet="The more discussion around goals, the more likely you and your team are to remain focused and accountable on achieving them. @Alexis5484" username="toprank"]

Tip #3: Focus on scalability

Once it’s time to step out of day-to-day execution and supervision and into leadership, you should focus more on optimizing and solving issues on a systematic basis, rather than local basis. When I was a new manager, I found myself constantly on the run putting out fires as they would pop up, instead of focusing on why it started and how to prevent it going forward.

  • Create make-sense processes. Identify the things your team does over and over again such as campaign launches, attending events, or adding new content to the website. These are replicable events that you can create process around and then optimize for efficiency, results, and so on.
  • Don’t feel like you have to stick to the status quo. Just because the marketing team has always had six copywriters, two content strategists, and an analyst, doesn’t mean that’s the ideal structure. Document the needs and functions of the organization and then map out the most make-sense roles to those needs. For the sake of the exercise, take the current situation out of it. You can employ a phased approach to get you from current situation to ideal. 

Tip #4: Shift the spotlight to your team

As you’re moving into leadership, you’re likely trying to build trust and show value to upper leadership, and it can be easy to lose focus on serving your team. Fostering a happy, well-functioning team is your top priority. Not only can you not do your job without them, but it is one of the best indicators of success to your boss and your boss’s boss. 

  • Shift how you find personal value from work. Most of us have moved into leadership, after being highly successful individual contributors and supervisors. As leaders, we must find more value from the task, result, or project we helped someone else achieve, rather than the work we did ourselves. 
  • Clear obstacles. Be transparent when you can; have your employees’ backs. These things build trust and create a secure, happy, and productive team. 
  • Cultivate the next round of leaders. Understand what your team wants to achieve personally within their careers within the next five or 10 years, and help them do that. As leaders, we should always be identifying and growing the team members who want to move to the next round in their careers. 

[bctt tweet="Most of us have moved into leadership, after being highly successful individual contributors and supervisors. As leaders, we must find more value from the task, result, or project we helped someone else achieve. @Alexis5484" username="toprank"]

Tip #5: Stay fresh on the job

At all levels of my career, I’ve found the best way to build trust with a team is to help them solve a problem. The more you understand your team’s job function, the more able you will be able to help them solve problems, innovate, and provide feedback to improve the function of their performance. 

  • Stay fresh. I find the best way to do this is to jump in and help execute from time to time. So, write a blog post or create the tactical plan. This keeps you from getting rusty, but also helps you empathize with your team and the challenges within their roles. 
  • Ask questions. Sometimes you won’t understand the details of what they’re working on, particularly if you’re leading a cross functional team. But ask questions. Help them look at the problem critically, and it’s likely you’ll guide them to their own answer. 

Tip #6: Be the leader

One of the toughest transitions from individual contributor to leader, is owning your role as the leader. For the first few years that I was managing a small team, I was more likely to be found deep in the weeds, doing the tasks I did in my previous job titles, than actually doing my work as a leader.

There were a couple reasons for this. It was comfortable doing the work; I already knew how to do it and I was good at. I also felt like I was most helpful to my team if I was helping them get the work done by actually doing the work. 

This was not true. See tip No. 3. You (and I) are most helpful to your team when you’re solving systematic problems, optimizing workflow and production, and creating a happy and secure work environment. If you’re always in the weeds, all you can see is the weeds. 

[bctt tweet="You're most helpful to your team when you’re solving systematic problems, optimizing workflow and production, and creating a happy and secure work environment. @Alexis5484 on being a #marketing leader" username="toprank"]

Tip #7: Keep learning

The leaders I am most inspired by inside and outside of my organization are probably the most voracious learners. Continuous learning through a variety of mediums will help you continue to evolve your skill set, bring in fresh ideas, and help you be inspired to test something new. Here are a couple of the resources that I go to:

  • Read: HBR is a go to for great content on how to lead, manage and shape a business. 
  • Listen: Dear HBR has a great Q&A format about navigating workplace challenges. 
  • Attend: Industry events are great for providing outside perspective, networking with other leaders and inspiring the evolution of your tactics. MarketingProfs is a great event for marketers.

Take Your Place at the Leadership Table

Each stage of your career offers a unique set of challenges and opportunities. The way in which you handle those situations—tackling them head-on or leaving them for someone else—has the potential to make or break your success in that position… and the one that may or may not come after. Keep these pieces of advice in mind as you work to build your team, your organization, and career as a leader.

Looking for more tips on how to inspire, motivate, and build a more effective marketing team? Check out our tips for getting your marketing team to work better together.

The post Tales from the Trenches: How to Transition from Marketing Doer to Marketing Leader appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

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