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9 YouTube stats to inform your marketing strategy in 2019

When YouTube first arrived in 2005, few likely had any idea how valuable it would become.

The first video, “Me at the Zoo,” launched on April 23, 2005, and the first ads followed two years later. By 2010, YouTube was generating more than two billion views each day.

As video has continued to grow as one of the most compelling channels for marketing and entertainment, YouTube has remained at the forefront.

By becoming familiar with some of the latest YouTube statistics, you’ll help ensure your marketing strategy for video content is on a path to success.

1.     There are 1.9 billion active users on YouTube

Currently, there are 1.9 billion active monthly users logging into YouTube. That’s one-third of all the people online and a heck of a lot of opportunity for any business.

YouTube’s popularity spans 91 countries and 80 different languages, covering about 95% of the global online population.

YouTube reaches more 18-49-year-olds on mobile alone than any cable TV network or broadcast.

As YouTube stats for marketers go, that’s great insight into where you could be spending your ad budget, or at the very least maintaining an active presence through video content of your own.

2.     YouTube is the second-most visited site in the world

According to Alexa rankings of the top 500 sites on the web, YouTube is second only to its parent company, Google, which is perhaps not surprising, but even more impressive when you consider the fact that it’s beating out Facebook, top Chinese search engine Baidu and Wikipedia, just to name a few.

Cisco predicted that video will make up 82% of global internet traffic by 2022, and with the year fast approaching, YouTube is one of the forces that certainly appears positioned to make it a reality.

Additionally, Google has revealed that YouTube users often search for ‘how to’ videos and other ‘search engine-like’ queries. This type of revealing user insight also makes YouTube a valuable source of social listening data that can help you pinpoint your audiences’ specific interests and needs.

3.     Millennials prefer YouTube over TV

According to a 2016 study released by Comscore and YouTube, 35% of the 2,940 respondents selected YouTube as their “one preferred provider,” while just 19% chose TV.

Additionally, a 2015 Forrester Research forecast predicted that by 2025, half of all TV viewers under the age of 32 will not subscribe to a traditional pay TV service.

Users are watching more than one billion hours of YouTube videos each day, with over half of those views coming from mobile devices at upwards of an hour each day.

In 2018, YouTube viewership grew by its fastest rate in recent years, increasing by 60% year-over-year. Outside of TV, YouTube also holds the edge when it comes to other social and streaming competition. There are more videos on YouTube than Facebook video and Netflix combined and YouTube videos earn more valuable attention, too.

A study using eye-tracking technology found that YouTube ads hold visual attention 62% of the time, compared to 45% of TV ads.

4.     Mobile devices dominate YouTube views, but TV is gaining

Just like general online search trends, YouTube usage predominantly happens on a mobile device, with that total now amounting to more than 70% of all watch time. On top of that, the rise of video content through other networks’ newer features like IGTV and Facebook Live has led to an overall increase in mobile video engagement. While some of these formats favor a vertical viewing aspect ratio, seven out of 10 YouTube users prefer horizontal viewing on their phones.

However, with advancements in technology and ever-growing popularity in online streaming devices like Apple TV and Roku, there have long been other ways to access YouTube outside of a computer and phone.

According to a 2017 YouTube Earnings Call, users watched more than 100 million hours of YouTube by way of their living room television, up 70% from the year prior. Additionally, it also was noted that YouTube TV covered two-thirds of U.S. households as of Q3 2017, when it had only just launched in February of that year.

5.     The average length of a first-page video is 14 minutes and 50 seconds

Backlinko shared findings from a study in which 1.3 million YouTube videos were analyzed to identify various ranking factors potentially impacting YouTube SEO. Among one of the most actionable findings for marketers was the discovery that long-form videos, specifically those clocking in at 14 minutes and 50 seconds, outperformed their shorter counterparts.

This hasn’t necessarily been a well-kept secret, though, as in 2012 YouTube unveiled a focus on “watch time,” while its parent company, Google, has held a patent for “Watch Time Based Ranking” since 2013.

Among other interesting YouTube stats that emerged from the Backlinko study were that 68% of the videos included in the study were in HD, likes were significantly correlated with better rankings, and comment count proved to be a strong factor in a video’s ranking.

Video comments YouTube ranking graph6.     Paid YouTube mobile ads are more likely to receive attention than TV ads
A mobile ad on YouTube will attract your customer’s attention 83% of the time. That’s even more impressive when you consider that TV ads only get the same level of attention 45% of the time. The same study also found that YouTube’s TrueView ads worked in synergy with TV ads to improve brand metrics like ad recall.

TrueView in-stream ads can be highly targeted, and Google found that relevant ads get 3 times more attention than the average video ad. This means that even though users can opt to skip these ads, catering to your audience with an attention-grabbing opening is likely to keep them viewing. What’s more, viewers who do watch an ad to completion are 23 times more likely to convert, subscribe to a channel, or share a video.

This means that if you strategically approach your video content, the outcomes could be phenomenal. When brands use the TrueView ad solution, they see their views of previous content increase by up to 500%.

Just remember that your YouTube ads will need to be robust–95% of YouTube ads are audible, compared to only 15% of Facebook ads. In other words, it’s not just about making your ads look good–it’s about making them sound right too. Google suggests that when ads are viewable and audible at the same time, they increase brand awareness and recall.

7. 46% of B2B buyers purchase something after watching video

A lot of companies assume that YouTube is strictly a B2C channel.

Currently, Smart Insights and Clutch rank YouTube as the 4th most valuable social channel for B2B marketers. YouTube stats for marketers don’t just apply to the B2C industry. The diversity of YouTube demographics extends to the B2B world too.

The Value of Social Media Platforms: B2C vs B2BPast studies from the International Data Group state that 46% of B2B tech buyers purchase products after viewing videos. If you show a client how well your service works through video, then they’re more likely to make an informed investment in your offering.

To back those stats up, Forbes also previously reported that around 75% of Fortune 500 executives turn to YouTube to help them make more educated decisions.

8. There are more than 50 million content creators on YouTube

It’s clear that if you are thinking of running your own YouTube campaign, you will have some competition. There are about 50 million active content creators on the platform today. The content creator base on YouTube is the biggest in the world, with some people earning five or six figures a year.

The number of channels on YouTube with more than 1 million subscribers also doubled in 2018–advertising the ongoing popularity of these creators and their consistent output of content that keeps viewers coming back.

This means that YouTube is an ideal network to include in any influencer marketing strategy you’re planning across social media. Individual creators, many of whom are also influencers, drive about 92% of the total views on sponsored videos on YouTube. Partnering with the right people could be the best way to make sure that your content gets in front of the right people, regardless of whether you’re a B2B or B2C brand.

9. Marketers are increasingly focused on YouTube ads

These days, no-one can afford to underestimate the power of video, and YouTube is a valuable platform for kicking off any video ad strategy. According to Animoto, 93% of marketers say they have landed a new customer thanks to social video in 2018.

Brands of all sizes and backgrounds are beginning to embrace YouTube as a powerful way of telling their story through a popular channel. As an example of this volume, 4,680 brands sponsored 8,964 videos just during the week of September 16th, 2018. In 2018, video on YouTube generated around $3.36 billion in ad revenues.

Marketers’ belief in the power of YouTube ads appears to be proven out by consumer behavior. Think with Google suggests that 90% of people find new products and brands through YouTube. Additionally, around half of all shoppers use video to help them make a purchasing decision, showing the influence of video throughout the purchase funnel.

Making the most of these YouTube stats

For marketers, the YouTube statistics covered here demonstrate how valuable the channel is. After 14 years, the platform is one of the most valuable in the world, for B2B and B2C companies alike. These stats clue you in on some of the most opportune ways that you can integrate YouTube video into your overall social strategy.

What kind of an approach are you bringing to your YouTube or video strategy? Let us know on Twitter @SproutSocial!

This post 9 YouTube stats to inform your marketing strategy in 2019 originally appeared on Sprout Social.

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About Daniel Rodgers

A lot of news that you will not see in the paper. A lot of technology that is coming out that will not see in the paper.

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Content Curation Inspiration: Types, Examples, & Use Cases for B2B Marketers

Content Curation Inspiration for B2B Marketers

If you create and share content, curation is part of your B2B marketing strategy. From seasoning a blog post with key third-party statistics to sharing an interesting article from an industry publication or influencer across your social channels, you’re curating.

But content curation has a place beyond adding an insight or two to your content.

With large volumes of information available today and short attention spans, curation allows content marketers to create more convenient, valuable content experiences for their target audience, while growing thought leadership, bolstering their content calendar, and increasing production efficiency.

What types of curation exist? How are B2B brands doing curation? When does it make sense to do curation? Let’s dive in.

Types of Content Curation and B2B Examples

The Curation Kitchen Staples: Microcontent

Statistics. Quotes. Tips. Social media commentary. Third-party videos. Gifs. Memes. Curated microcontent is what gives your content its flavor—whether its used as seasoning in a long-form blog post or modularly in short-form social content. This is foundational curation, and it plays a role in all other types. And as TopRank Marketing CEO Lee Odden once said:

“Snackable content can often be managed and repurposed like ingredients to create a main course. On their own, short-form content like quotes, tips, and statistics are useful for social network shares and as added credibility to blog posts, eBooks, and articles.”

See what I did there? Microcontent is simplistic and easy to integrate, helping you provide more depth and insight on a topic, infuse credibility, and highlight industry experts.

When microcontent curation makes sense: Always—if the content is relevant to the topic you’re discussing. Microcontent helps you provide proof points to bolster your narrative and build credibility with your audience.

The Curation Classics: Roundups, Listicles, and Resource Hubs

Collecting key bits of information and insights and organizing them into an easy to digest format is the quintessential content curation tactic. The premise is simple: You’re gathering interesting tidbits from multiple sources on a specific topic and placing them in one central location.

The underlying theme for this curation tactic (and any content tactic for that matter) is relevance and value. It needs to be topically relevant to your audience and it can’t be a lazy compilation; it needs to serve a purpose.

News roundups are perhaps the most popular of the curation classics. We’ve all seen them and likely have a few we go back to on a regular basis, so I won’t spend too much time here. (Shameless plug to check out our weekly digital marketing news roundup.)

But here’s an example of a roundup style piece from EHS and sustainability consulting firm *Antea Group that brings video content together to have a little fun and spark a connection with the audience.

The post showcases six workplace safety videos—all sourced and easily embedded from YouTube—with movie-critic-like commentary that make connections to the daily life and work of their target audience.

Content Curation Example from Antea Group

When it comes to resource hubs, HubSpot is an “ultimate list” destination on a variety of subjects, most notably digital marketing statistics. Here’s a recent example featuring Instagram statistics.

Content Curation Example from HubSpot

For listicles, one of our recent BIGLIST editions featuring 50 of the top marketing blogs featuring martech brands is a solid example. Time was spent on researching and vetting, and the list provides a short and sweet description of each blog, as well as our favorite recent article to give readers a cue on what’s worth checking out first.

Content Curation Example from TopRank Marketing's Lee Odden

Finally, events can be great opportunities for curation. *Introhive, an enterprise relationship management (ERM) platform, regularly curates social and team member insights to compile post-event infographics with top takeaways.

Content Curation Example from Introhive

When classic curation makes sense: Classic curation is largely an awareness and engagement play. If you’re looking to provide your audience with a helpful resource that hits quick on the points, and showcase your brand as a thoughtful expert in the space, this type of curation can make it easy for your audience to find insight and inspiration—and minimize the amount of time they need to spend on the hunt.

The Next Level of Curation: Thought Leadership Mashups

Curation isn’t limited to assembling a robust, scannable list of information or resources, or seasoning original content with stats, quotes, or videos. Curation can fuel thought leadership.

Great examples of this kind of curation are trends-focused pieces. Taking a cue from the classic curation formats, this kind of content aims to identify one or more trend or pattern using curated bits of information, all tied together with your knowledge and expertise.

This could be small-scale or large-scale—meaning a single concept could provide the supporting content or tie-in, or it could be your take on a collection of related trends, facts, or insights. This piece from *SAP’s Digitalist Magazine is a great example.

Content Curation Example from Introhive

But this kind of curation doesn’t just lend itself to discussing trends. Many of our own blog posts use a mashup curation method to educate and engage marketers, and define our perspectives and approach to marketing.

This can be seen in a recent post from Nick Nelson on how to write clear, concise content. Using our words intentionally is a core belief, and Nick was able to illustrate that with his deep knowledge and some relevant insights from third parties.

Content Curation Example from TopRank Marketing's Nick Nelson

Also, when we say “curation,” we don’t just mean collecting insights from third-party sources. You can curate your own content—it’s just most often called repurposing.

Salesforce has a great example here. This recent post touches on a key trend in the marketplace (lack of consumer trust), leverages microcontent from Salesforce’s own research (the Trends in Consumer Trust research report), and then original content builds a narrative for a specific audience (retailers).

Content Curation Example from Salesforce

In addition, curating and repurposing influencer content is an especially big opportunity. More than likely, the insights that influencers share with you have implications and applications across other related topics.

When curation mashups make sense: If you want to build thought leadership on a subject, mashups should be in your content lineup. Mashups allow you to elevate an idea, perspective, challenge, or opportunity, while using existing content as a jumping off-point or as part of the foundation of your take.

Read: A Tasty, Strategic Addition to the Content Marketing Table: ‘Repurposed Content Cobbler’

Content Curation for the Win

Regardless of your editorial plan, you’re already doing some form of content curation. However, you can make curation a more deliberate and effective part of your overall B2B content marketing strategy.

Whether you create an ultimate list featuring statistics from multiple sources, provide high-level takeaways from an event or report, give your own content new life to build thought leadership, content curation can provide value and convenience for your audience and writing team.

Looking for content curation best practices, tools, and more examples? Check out our post on Content Curation 101.

*Disclosure: Antea Group, SAP, and Introhive are TopRank Marketing clients.

The post Content Curation Inspiration: Types, Examples, & Use Cases for B2B Marketers appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

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