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Trick or Treat: The Spellbinding Marketing Sweets the TopRank Team Can’t Resist

Spellbinding Marketing Sweets the TopRank Team Can’t Resist

Spellbinding Marketing Sweets the TopRank Team Can’t Resist

Admit it. On Halloween night, the fierce competitor within you sprinted from home to home to claim as much sugary bounty as your pillowcase could carry. But the loyalist and purist in you was on the hunt for a specific candy treat. A treat that put all the rest to shame; a treat that always hit the sweet spot.

via GIPHY

For me, that coveted treat was: the Almond Joy. Sweetened coconut. Crunchy almonds. Smooth milk chocolate. Devilishly delicious, but ghoulishly elusive amongst a sea of KitKat- and Snickers-purchasing households. (Here’s to you, organic reach on Facebook.)

As marketers, we all have our favorites. From tactical techniques that sweeten our marketing mix to the integration of marketing elements to tantalize our audience’s taste buds, the TopRank Marketing team weighs in on both fun- and king-size marketing treats they can’t resist.

Our Favorite Marketing Sweet Treats

Josh NiteJosh Nite

Senior Content Marketing Manager

My favorite candy is black licorice. Black licorice doesn't appeal to everyone. That's a quality I like in candy—and in marketing, too. It's easy to make something bland and sweet that everyone tolerates—like, say, Necco Wafers—but that's not how you get raving fans. I've never met anyone passionate about Necco Wafers. Conversely, I've never met anyone who "kind of liked" black licorice. You love it or you hate it.

Good marketing takes a bold stand, with personality and purpose. It draws in a target audience and excludes the rest. Love or hate black licorice, it's a perfect reminder that great marketing doesn't aspire to blandness.

Elizabeth Williams

Senior Account Manager

Baby Ruth: My favorite part about Baby Ruth bars is they've got a little bit of everything—nuts, nougat, caramel, all with a chocolate coating. And, flavors all work so well together! To work well, good marketing must parallel Baby Ruths: A diverse yet integrated mix so that we can reach our audiences whenever and wherever they are and with a consistent message that resonates with their needs.

Nick NelsonNick Nelson

Senior Content Strategist

Skittles. These bite-sized bursts of fruity flavor remind me of social media marketing. The bright colors reflect the vibrant imagery that stands out on feeds, and the many different flavors and colors represent the diversity of voices and viewpoints you can find across various networks.

Annie LeumanAnnie Leuman

Content Strategist

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups. Two incredible ingredients in their own right, come together to make an irresistible combo—kind of like SEO and content. Content is the peanut buttery center, and it’s wrapped in the perfect amount of chocolate to delight it’s consumers’ senses (and leave us all asking for more).

Ashley Zeckman

Senior Director of Digital Strategy

I’ll admit it, I’m a sucker for Starbursts. There are so many different delicious flavor varieties—from tropical to classic to my all-time personal favorite: All Reds. Much like the industry experts and influencers we partner with, the different flavor profiles add punch and pizzazz to the content palette. 

Tiffani AllenTiffani Allen

Associate Director of Search & Analytics

Twix. To borrow from Saturday Night Live’s Stefon: This candy has everything. Chocolate. Caramel. Cookies. A clever marketing strategy. Everything, people. 

The combination of three complementary, yet distinctly different flavors reminds me of a well-integrated digital marketing mix of search, content, and influence. While each discipline on its own is delicious, it’s the mix of all three that produces a truly crave-worthy treat. 

Lane EllisLane Ellis

Social Media and Content Marketing Manager

From the 1850s until the 1920s my great-great-uncle Henry H. Ellis, and later his son, ran a confectionery and bakery making homemade candies. The business started first in Janesville, WI and then from 1867 on, moved to Cheyenne, WY, so I suppose my fondness for sweets runs in my family.

I love marzipan and adore chocolate, so as a child over Halloween, when a particularly generous and creative woman placed a wrapped chocolate-covered marzipan candy in my sugary goodie bag, I was overjoyed.

Decades later, the two mingling flavors are still a favorite, and remind me of a type of marketing nirvana in which two already excellent practices meld together to form something truly rare and beautiful, akin to when a favorite professional comedian takes over the social media channels of a company you're a longtime fan of.

Witch Way to the Candy?

Sorry. Bad pun. Moving on … Regardless of where your loyalties lie in the marketing sweets realm, perhaps the nuggets above will encourage you to reach into the candy bowl for a new variety.

What marketing sweet is at the top of your trick or treating list? Tell us in the comments section below.

The post Trick or Treat: The Spellbinding Marketing Sweets the TopRank Team Can’t Resist appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

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5 Thank You Pages That Take Post-Conversion to the Next Level

Thank you pages are an important part of your post-conversion strategy. We've gathered effective examples and tips from Unbounce customers to help you get started.

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5 Top B2B Brands Mastering Facebook Engagement

Colorful pallet of crushed pigment powders image.

Colorful pallet of crushed pigment powders image.

With more than 2.4 billion users worldwide, Facebook has long been a popular platform for brands both B2B and direct-to-consumer looking to creatively and effectively showcase their products and services.

Facebook has released scores of new features over the past several years that have not only helped it remain among the most-used social media platforms — despite facing well-publicized challenges over the past several years — but also increasingly to become a destination for professional business users, and users looking for a social experience markedly different from LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

With Facebook having launched so many new tools for brands to maximize their engagement on the platform, let’s take a look at how five large primarily B2B companies are creatively  connecting with audiences through pages, groups, communities, and several other methods Facebook provides.

#1 — Canva

Canva Image

https://www.facebook.com/canva/
1,359,228 followers

Since arriving on the Web graphic-design scene in 2012, Canva has seen its numerous creative tools adopted by more professionals every year, with company valuations hitting $2.5 billion in 2019.

With its recently-launches Canva Enterprise design platform targeting brands by offering features including digital asset management and multi-channel campaign management, Canva counts among its B2B clients Pfizer, RE/MAX, and others.

As a firm catering to creative professionals, it’s no surprise that Canva artistically uses its Facebook presence to engage with its community of some 1.3 million page followers, using entertaining video, informative image-rich posts, and coverage of events such as its recent Canva for Enterprise launch New York Times Square billboard.

Canva Example 1

Canva regularly asks relevant questions of its Facebook community and actively responds positively in emoji-rich comments, such as a recent color and hue-related post which inquired “How are hue feeling?”

Canva Example 2

Canva hosts several Facebook groups including a Canva Teachers Community, a Canva Design Circle, and a Canva Nonprofits Community, utilizes Facebook Events to promote its real-life events such as its recent “Design School After Hours: Branding your Business” workshop, and actively engages with Facebook fans in its page’s community section.

#2 — Airbnb

Airbnb

https://www.facebook.com/airbnb/
16,152,571 followers

Airbnb has skillfully utilized its Facebook presence to build a sizable following of more than 16 million fans, and with initiatives such as its Airbnb for Work program targeting business — used by companies including Salesforce and PayPal — the firm is a fine example of how B2B audiences can be engaged and nurtured on Facebook.

Native video posts centered around relevant holidays, such as Airbnb’s recent “Welcome to Cisco. Population: 1” initiative — part of its “spooky stays” program — encourage Facebook fans to share and take part.

Airbnb Example

#3 — Mailchimp

Mailchimp

https://www.facebook.com/mailchimp/
405,208 followers

For email marketing and automation firm Mailchimp, Facebook serves as an important social media platform to communicate with and inform clients and potential partners.

Sharing marketing advice, studies, reports, contests and more, Mailchimp’s Facebook page thrives by helping both established B2B firms and new businesses with actionable insight delivered in entertaining and visually enticing stories.

Facebook also serves as a platform for sharing news from Mailchimp’s many initiatives, including its original podcasts such as “The Jump with Shirley Manson.”

Mailchimp Example

#4 — Boeing

Boeing

https://www.facebook.com/Boeing/
1,433,349 followers

Boeing uses its sizable Facebook following to share behind-the-scenes video glimpses into the firm and its many programs around the world, such as a recent "Have you ever wondered?" look at how it goes about capturing the oftentimes breathtaking aerial footage it features on the page.

Boeing Example

Boeing also regularly encourages its Facebook fans to take part in a variety of corporate social responsibility efforts, such as a recent two-way conversation program for Disability Awareness Month.

Boeing Example 2

#5 — 3M

3M

https://www.facebook.com/3M/
4,666,707 followers

3M* cleverly uses a variety of video, image-rich, live-streaming, and other types of Facebook posts to actively share news and information about its many global programs, such as a recent "3M Young Scientist Challenge" call for votes.

3M Example 1

At TopRank Marketing we are B2B influencer marketing specialists, and have recently worked to feature influencers in our client 3M’s Champions of Science series of podcasts.

Recent industry experts appearing on Champions of Science have included geophysicist Mika McKinnon, Professor Stephen Curry, Department of Life Sciences at Imperial College London, Dr. Suze Kundu, Materials Chemist and Science Presenter, Chris Gammell, Principal, Analog Life, LLC, and Matt Hartings, Associate Professor of Chemistry at American University.

3M Example 2

Using podcasting can be a great way to improve customer experience game, and we’ve published several in-depth looks at how B2B marketers can promote podcasts, and have also gathered together an industry-leading list of top marketing-related podcasts, which you can find here:

Finally, 3M was the only firm in our list which automatically opens a Facebook chat window to instantly begin communications if desired.

Delivering a Solid & Sustainable Facebook Strategy

It’s clear from the varied examples we’ve looked at here cleverly implemented by Canva, Airbnb, Mailchimp, Boeing, and 3M that there are numerous methods for successfully building a solid and sustainable Facebook brand strategy.

* 3M is a TopRank Marketing client.

The post 5 Top B2B Brands Mastering Facebook Engagement appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

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How to Advertise on TikTok

Is your business using TikTok? Wondering how to advertise on TikTok? In this article, you’ll learn how to create TikTok ads to promote your products or services. Are TikTok Ads Right for Your Business? With more than 500 million active users worldwide, TikTok presents an enormous opportunity to advertisers. Not only has TikTok surpassed Twitter […]

The post How to Advertise on TikTok appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

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Always On: 4 ways I maximize my bandwidth every day with Sprout Social’s Olivia Jepson

Since joining the social team at Sprout, I’ve grown a lot—both as a social media practitioner and as a creative contributor. Learning to maximize Read more...

This post Always On: 4 ways I maximize my bandwidth every day with Sprout Social’s Olivia Jepson originally appeared on Sprout Social.

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How to design a logo

So you want to design a logo for your company or organization. If you have the resources, our first suggestion is to hire or Read more...

This post How to design a logo originally appeared on Sprout Social.

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‘Tis the season: Retailers can expect 40% more social messages this holiday season

With today’s consumers on the go, it’s no wonder shopping is becoming more digital and social than ever before. Mobile-first shopping is up 24% Read more...

This post ‘Tis the season: Retailers can expect 40% more social messages this holiday season originally appeared on Sprout Social.

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Creating B2B Content With Impact: Pearls of Wisdom from Marketing Leaders

Back in 2017, Dr. Rick Rigsby delivered an impassioned commencement speech at California State University Maritime Academy, sending the internet into a motivational frenzy. The minister, speaker, and former college professor regaled the audience with key learnings from the “wisest person” he’d ever met—a third-grade dropout, who also happened to be his father.

Despite his lack of formal education, Dr. Rigsby’s father rigorously pursued learning and growth, instilling a drive for excellence within his children and providing a light in the darkest of times. But perhaps the biggest takeaway from Dr. Rigsby’s speech would eventually become his motivational catchphrase:

“Make an impact, not just an impression.”

via GIPHY

As everyday humans, Dr. Rigsby’s message reminds us that striving to be our best selves can have a profound effect on the world around us. And I’d say that for B2B content marketers, this is more than just an inspiring directive, but also a growing imperative.

We all know that the days of creating content for content’s sake are long gone. Customers and buyers crave insight, expect relevance, and demand better brand experiences. We need to create content for maximum positive impact.

In the spirit of combining knowledge with wisdom to make an impact, I’ve pulled together a collection of motivational insights across three key areas from some of the industry’s best and brightest B2B marketers.

Creating B2B Content That Makes an Impact on Buyers

From Start to Finish, Empathy Is the Pathway to Truly Understanding Our Audience

“Know your audience” is an age-old B2B content marketing commandment. But knowing your audience goes beyond job title, company size, and the pain points your product can solve. You need to understand their motivations, attitudes, and perceptions, as well as how they interact with your brand. You need to put yourself in their shoes.

Ann HandleyDelighting your audience includes understanding your customers, and understanding how your prospects or customers interact with your brand… Your goal is to be pathologically empathic to your customers. Why? Because: Empathy is the Miracle-Gro of a thriving customer-centric business.

Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer, MarketingProfs

[bctt tweet="Empathy is the Miracle-Gro of a thriving customer-centric business. @AnnHandley @MarketingProfs #B2BContentMarketing" username="toprank"]

This empathy needs to be present from planning to measurement to optimization.

True content marketing starts at setting specific, concrete goals on what we believe audiences who engage with our content will do vs. those who don’t. Will they close faster? Will they stay longer? Will they buy more? That’s the benefit of content marketing. And it starts with setting measurable goals not for the content — but for the audience we want to impact.

Robert Rose, Chief Strategy Advisor, Content Marketing Institute

[bctt tweet="True content marketing starts at setting specific, concrete goals on what we believe audiences who engage with our content will do vs. those who don’t. @Robert_Rose #B2BContentMarketing" username="toprank"]

And when it comes to your influencer marketing initiatives, you need to marry audience and influencer insights to hit the perfect point of impact.

Successful partnerships with influencers require an understanding of what the audience wants and how a brand/influencer collaboration can give it to them. Finding ideal influencers for impact means discovering those with on-topic credibility, the ability to publish, and engaged network and a willingness to share.

Matching the right types of influencers with the right content for mutual benefit is essential. Brandividuals can drive awareness, subject matter experts can create engagement and customers who advocate can help inspire sales. As a result, customers get great content, brands attract new customers and influencers earn exposure and access to opportunities.

Lee Odden, CEO of TopRank Marketing

[bctt tweet="Successful partnerships with influencers require an understanding of what the audience wants and how a brand/influencer collaboration can give it to them. @leeodden #B2BContentMarketing" username="toprank"]

Read: How to Refocus on Your Audience for Better Content Marketing Results

Product-Centric Content Doesn’t Resonate, So Strive to Create Relevant Two-Way Conversations

For years, the TopRank Marketing team has been both advocate and practitioner of what we call best-answer content marketing. The premise is simple: Your audience has questions. You have the power to answer them whenever and wherever your audience is searching. But this goes beyond developing content based on keyword research or pumping out what we've always done.

Carlos AblerWe admonish companies to ‘become publishers’. However, boredom is not a PUBLISHING problem, it’s a RELEVANCE problem, which is an INNOVATION problem. B2B's publish endless content, but studies show underperforming outcomes in aggregate. We must synthesize the throughput and format models of publishing with those of social innovation and entrepreneurship.

Carlos Abler, Content Marketing Strategist and Keynote Speaker

[bctt tweet="Boredom is not a PUBLISHING problem, it’s a RELEVANCE problem, which is an INNOVATION problem. @Carlos_Abler #B2BContentMarketing" username="toprank"]

Social listening. Building relevant influencer partnerships. Providing thought leadership on burgeoning trends. Learning from what other brands are doing inside and outside our industry. Content marketing isn’t the act of creating and distributing content.

Peter IssacsonGreat content isn’t about platitudes. It’s about provocation. Incitement. Taking a stand and making your audience think in a new way. Giving the counterargument to conventional wisdom. When we do that, we advance the dialogue, rather than diminish it.

Peter Issacson, Chief Marketing Officer, Demandbase

[bctt tweet="Great content isn’t about platitudes. It’s about provocation. Incitement. Taking a stand and making your audience think in a new way. Giving the counterargument to conventional wisdom. @peisaacon #B2BContentMarketing" username="toprank"]

Put simply, content marketing is about delivering buyer's with needed information, jumpstarting discussion, fostering engagement, encouraging collaboration, and above all else listening and then responding to what our audience needs from us. That’s how we make a meaningful impact.

In a dialogue, you cannot truly listen if you’re just impatiently waiting for your turn to speak. In a noisy content world, this behavior is inadvertently applied in how we, as content leaders, engage with our audiences. We pump out content and then wait until it’s our turn to speak again and pump out some more per our content calendars. What use is it if neither side is listening? Content is meant to be a source of dialogue.

Tameka Vasquez, Assistant Vice President and Global Marketing Lead, Genpact

[bctt tweet="We pump out content and then wait until it’s our turn to speak again and pump out some more per our content calendars. What use is it if neither side is listening? @tameka_vasquez #B2BContentMarketing" username="toprank"]

Without a Strategic Promotion Plan, Expect Minimum Impact

Your content will never reach its full potential—nor your audience—without a thoughtful promotion plan. Period.

The “Field of Dreams” B2B marketing game is over in 2019. If you build it, launch it or just create it, nobody is coming! It’s not only important to create a content strategy, tell great stories and solve customer problems, but you must customize and personalize this content and bring it to your audience where they are currently engaging.

Brian Fanzo, Founder and CEO, iSocialFanz LLC

[bctt tweet="The 'Field of Dreams' B2B marketing game is over in 2019. If you build it, launch it or just create it, nobody is coming! @iSocialFanz #B2BContentMarketing" username="toprank"]

Think of it this way: You’ve spent countless hours digging into who your audience is and what they need. Don’t fall short, especially when it comes to designing a plan that aims to not only inform, but captivate.

Don’t cut corners when it comes to creating a promotional plan. The ubiquity of mobile devices, social channels, and online content means that your ability to draw someone’s attention is mostly visual now. Images, graphics, videos, color choice, and layout are all key to grabbing someone’s attention in those two seconds as they scroll through a feed…

Your images need to convey meaning and value without using words. Boring, generic stock photos won’t cut it. Contrary to popular belief, people do still read traditional content forms like whitepapers, eBooks and case studies, but first you’ll need to pull them in with attention-grabbing visuals that show them what they’ll get before you tell them what they’ll get.

Michelle Liro, Vice Present of Demand Generation, PTC

[bctt tweet="Contrary to popular belief, people do still read traditional content forms like whitepapers, eBooks and case studies, but first you’ll need to pull them in with attention-grabbing visuals. @michelleliro #B2BContentMarketing" username="toprank"]

Make an Impact on Your Audience

As part of his closing, Dr. Rigsby told his audience: “If you’re going to do something, do it the right way… in that way you will grow your influence and make an impact.”

Strive to go from having audience knowledge to audience empathy. Don’t just strive to create content; deliver insight and create conversations. And finally, remember that your content marketing initiatives can't make a positive impact if you cut corners on promotion.

I’ll close with one more tidbit that I absolutely love from Ardath Albee, CEO and B2B Marketing Strategist at Marketing Interactions:

[bctt tweet="Aim higher than a cliché. The objective is to transform mundane ideas into memorable ones. @ardath421" username="toprank"]

Want more incredible insights from seasoned B2B marketers? Check out our recent B2B Marketing Fitness eBook featuring tips and advice from 16 marketing leaders.

B2B Marketing Fitness

The post Creating B2B Content With Impact: Pearls of Wisdom from Marketing Leaders appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

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4 Ways to Improve Your Instagram Stories Organic Reach

Want more organic reach for your Instagram stories? Wondering how to create Instagram stories people will watch? In this article, you’ll find four ways to keep more eyes on your Instagram stories, without using ads. How the Instagram Stories Algorithm Works The Instagram algorithm determines the number of followers who see your stories. The algorithm tries […]

The post 4 Ways to Improve Your Instagram Stories Organic Reach appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

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Trust Begins Within: The Vital Importance of Building Internal Trust in Marketing

Building Internal Trust in Marketing

Building Internal Trust in Marketing

Let’s cut to the chase: If brands and marketers can’t build trust internally at their organizations, they’ll never be able to develop it outwardly in an authentic way. Plain and simple.

When marketers broadcast trustworthiness as a virtue through content and messaging, while their company visibly deals with discord and misalignment in its own ranks, the sentiment rings about as hollow as a sinister-looking Disney villain telling the protagonist through a wicked grin that of course they can be trusted. (Except that today’s customers are more savvy and adept than those necessarily naive fictional film heroes.)

via GIPHY

Employees need to trust their leaders, and vice versa. Various functions and departments must foster trust between one another. When a sturdy foundation of confidence, reliability, and belief is in place, this will naturally emanate externally. But the opposite is also true, and it’s something all brands should be thinking about as trust-building becomes a primary differentiator in the business world.

Building Trust Within Your Organization

When a genuine culture of trust is established inside your organization, the benefits are innumerable: It fosters better collaboration, encourages transparency, and enables problem-solving. Perhaps most crucially, it also greatly affects the way your organization is perceived. 

Let’s explore this dynamic through a few different lenses.

Trust Between Marketing Leadership and the C-Suite

Per the latest numbers, the average CMO tenure checks in about 43 months — less than half that of a CEO. Lee Odden has described this as "a crisis in confidence amongst business leadership when it comes to marketing." At the same time, marketing's impact on business results is undeniable.

[bctt tweet="Marketing done well with a clear why, measurement and purpose creates the kind of value that both customers and business leaders will trust, ensuring credibility and investment far into the future. @leeodden #TrustInMarketing" username="toprank"]

Clearly, there is widespread opportunity to strengthen relationships and solidify trust between marketing leadership and the C-suite. Openness, increased collaboration, and bottom-line proof are among the keys to achieving this. Lee shared insights and advice from a wide range of CMOs and marketing influencers on strengthening trust in marketing

A few of my favorites:

“The best way I’ve found to get people onboard with your way of thinking is to do some marketing of your marketing. In other words, treat every relationship as if they were a customer.” — Margaret Magnarelli 

“Honesty. I know it sounds trite but trust is earned and earned through honesty. As marketers and storytellers we often 'spin' things to suit our needs. I think more honesty about the company you represent is the only way to succeed. People relate to flaws. It’s human.” — Julie Roehm 

“In today’s world it’s all about the quality of A.I.R. you create; Authentic, Inspirational and Realistic marketing will win over your internal and external customers.” — Jeanniey Mullen 

Trust Within the Marketing Team

This is ground zero. Marketers are responsible for managing a brand’s outward image; when conflict and challenges plague the internal team, it’ll be tough to convey the notion of a unified front that’s all rowing in the same direction.

When our Vice President of Client Accounts Alexis Hall blogged here recently about making the transition from marketing doer to marketing leader, she noted that cultivating trust on her team was top-of-mind. “Fostering a happy, well-functioning team is your top priority,” Alexis writes. “Not only can you not do your job without them, but it is one of the best indicators of success to your boss and your boss’s boss.”

Among her recommendations are shifting the way we find personal value in our work (it’s not just about what you accomplish, but what you help others accomplish), clearing obstacles, and developing leadership qualities within those who show the potential to move up. 

[bctt tweet="Fostering a happy, well-functioning team is your top priority. Not only can you not do your job without them, but it is one of the best indicators of success to your boss and your boss’s boss. @Alexis5484 #TrustInMarketing" username="toprank"]

Trust Across Departments and Functions

Building trust within the marketing department can be challenging enough on its own. Even if these individuals work together regularly, use the same lingo, and generally understand the specific roles for each player, global organizations need to coordinate between different regions and business units. Corporate marketing often pushes generic messaging in uniform fashion, overlooking the need for localization and contextual nuance. 

Apply this dynamic across departmental or functional divides, and matters can become all the more tricky.

We all know about the infamous barriers between marketing and sales. But it’s also important to establish strong relationships between marketing and customer success, product development, human resources, and beyond. 

The soundness of cross-functional relationships in your organization manifests in many ways: efficiency of production, consistency of external messaging, the way colleagues interact with one another while in meetings or on calls with clients, and so on. 

How to improve the connectivity of siloed units? There are a few key opportunities:

  • Transparency: Make it easy for folks in one department to see what’s going on in another. 
  • Honesty/Candor: Encourage people to speak up if they’re bothered of confused by what’s going on elsewhere in the company.
  • Eliminate Isolation: Cross-functional meetings, or team outings that bring together individuals who don’t generally collaborate, can be really helpful.

Trust Between Employee and Employer

The 2019 Edelman Trust Barometer hints at the existence of a new employer-employee contract: 

Employees are ready and willing to trust their employers, but the trust must be earned through more than “business as usual.” Employees’ expectation that prospective employers will join them in taking action on societal issues (67 percent) is nearly as high as their expectations of personal empowerment (74 percent) and job opportunity (80 percent).

The rewards of meeting these expectations and building trust are great. Employees who have trust in their employer are far more likely to engage in beneficial actions on their behalf—they will advocate for the organization (a 39-point trust advantage), are more engaged (33 points), and remain far more loyal (38 points) and committed (31 points) than their more skeptical counterparts.

Those items in the second paragraph make clear the tangible benefits of emphasizing trust between employees and your company’s top leadership, and the first paragraph offers useful guidance on how to get there. In particular, executives can connect more meaningfully with their employees by rallying them around a higher purpose and taking a stand on things that matter to the team. 

Building Trust, Inside and Out

There’s a reason we cover the topic of trust in marketing so frequently, and from so many different angles, on this blog: It’s complex and multifaceted. One missing ingredient — especially at a fundamental level — can lead to dysfunctional operations, lower output quality, and attrition of employees and customers alike.

When trust is built from the inside out, happy CEOs, marketing teams, and employees beget happy customers and engaged prospects. This is an area where marketing can and should take ownership and lead the charge.

[bctt tweet="When trust is built from the inside out, happy CEOs, marketing teams, and employees beget happy customers and engaged prospects. - @NickNelsonMN #TrustInMarketing" username="toprank"]

Learn more about TopRank Marketing’s views on trust in marketing by checking out past entries in our Trust Factors series:

The post Trust Begins Within: The Vital Importance of Building Internal Trust in Marketing appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

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