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Communicating Value Effectively: Respecting the customer’s right to draw their own conclusions

No one likes a braggart.

When someone states that they’re the best at something, my immediate reaction is to question such a bold claim — and to get a little irritated. It’s cute when a kid does it. It’s not so cute when an adult does the bragging.

Customers feel the same way when they visit your webpage. They are bombarded daily by marketing ads that love to use that word “best.”

“We’re the best” … “We have the best” … “We make the best …”

“The goal of marketing is not to make a claim; the goal of marketing is to foster a conclusion.”

Flint McGlaughlin, CEO and Managing Director, MECLABS Institute

But if you want to stand out in the marketplace, instead of making a claim that you are the best, show your prospective customers that you are the best — with specific, quantifiable facts. Then, let them draw their own conclusions whether you are, indeed, the best at what you do, or not.

When you allow the customer the freedom to do their own thinking — to infer from a solid list of quantifiable, credible reasons — you are valuing the customer, and, in return, the customer values you and your product or services.

In this Quick Win Clinic, Flint McGlaughlin looks at a claim made by book creator website Bookemon that states it is the “Best Book Creator,” and evaluates how well it presents the facts about said claim.

The post Communicating Value Effectively: Respecting the customer’s right to draw their own conclusions appeared first on MarketingExperiments.

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About Daniel Rodgers

Daniel Rodgers
A lot of news that you will not see in the paper. A lot of technology that is coming out that will not see in the paper.

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